Due to COVID-19, country and local conditions are changing, and travel information is often confusing. Below is a summary of issues that should be considered when returning to the United States. Individuals should also contact their airline to confirm if there are specific boarding requirements.

COVID-19 Test? National Interest Exception (NIE)?
I am a U.S. Citizen, LPR, or other exempted individual* … Yes. All air passengers over two years old entering the United States must present to the airline prior to boarding a negative COVID-19 test, taken within three (3) calendar days of departure​, or proof of recovery from the virus within the last 90 days. No.
I am a foreign national with a valid visa stamp and I-797/I-129S … Yes. All air passengers over two years old entering the United States must present to the airline prior to boarding a negative COVID-19 test, taken within three (3) calendar days of departure​, or proof of recovery from the virus within the last 90 days.

Yes, if travelling from South Africa, Schengen, the UK, Ireland, Brazil, China, and Iran.

No, if travelling from another jurisdiction other than South Africa, Schengen, the UK, Ireland, Brazil, China, and Iran (unless an exemption applies)

I am a foreign national and do NOT have a valid visa stamp and I-797/I-129S … Yes. All air passengers over two years old entering the United States must present to the airline prior to boarding a negative COVID-19 test, taken within three (3) calendar days of departure​, or proof of recovery from the virus within the last 90 days. Yes. You will require an NIE to be able to obtain a visa stamp in your passport. Furthermore, if travelling from South Africa, Schengen, the UK, Ireland, Brazil, China, and Iran, you will also require an NIE to travel to the U.S.
  • Country and Local Conditions: Conditions are rapidly changing. Check your local requirements, and your airline’s requirements, prior to travel. Click here for updated, country-specific information.
  • Visa appointments: A visa appointment should be scheduled right away. If a desired date is not available, an emergency appointment can be requested. However, emergency appointments are highly discretionary and are limited to residents applying for a visa in their home country. Appointments may also be cancelled by the consulates with little notice.
  • National Interest Exception (NIE): If granted, an NIE is valid for 30 days from the date of issue for one entry into the United States. An NIE may be requested only from outside of the United States. Most consulates’ processing times are 30-60 days.
  • *Other exempted individuals include, but are not limited to: Noncitizen nationals of the U.S.; noncitizen who is the spouse of a U.S. citizen or LPR; any noncitizen who is the parent or legal guardian of a U.S. citizen or LPR, provided that the U.S. citizen or LPR is unmarried and under the age of 21; and any noncitizen who is the sibling of a U.S. citizen or LPR, provided that both are unmarried and under the age of 21. Click here to view a full list.
  • **Information is based on current policies. Immigration and travel policies remain fluid, and COVID-19 restrictions are constantly changing.
  • U.S. Department of State: click here to view a list of exempted individuals.
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Photo of Anna H. Morzy Anna H. Morzy

Anna H. Morzy has a comprehensive background in providing legal and policy guidance on fast-evolving immigration laws, regulations, and policies, and in the development and execution of complex, industry-tailored mobility programs.

With nearly 20 years of experience in her field, Anna has a

Anna H. Morzy has a comprehensive background in providing legal and policy guidance on fast-evolving immigration laws, regulations, and policies, and in the development and execution of complex, industry-tailored mobility programs.

With nearly 20 years of experience in her field, Anna has a deep understanding of immigration law and global mobility and their critical importance to businesses of all sizes and across varying industries. Her practice focuses on providing counsel to start-ups and established companies on the immigration compliance implications of expansions and mergers and acquisitions and on effective corporate mobility strategy. She provides comprehensive guidance for foreign national employees, evaluates and implements immigration policies, and seamlessly integrates effective mobility and compliance strategies with clients’ unique business models and goals.

Anna’s practice encompasses providing legal guidance on matters related to nonimmigrant visas, permanent residence, naturalization, compliance management and audit representation, EB-5 visas, E-Verify and I-9 programs, and ICE enforcement.

Anna also contributes significantly to the business and immigration community across Illinois. As a member of the Steering Committee of the Illinois Business Immigration Coalition, a former president of the Polish American Chamber of Commerce, and a board member of the Polish Museum of America, she regularly works with top political officials in Illinois to ensure awareness and integration of immigrant communities and businesses. She is a prominent advocate for issues related to U.S. immigration law and the importance of attracting foreign direct investment to Illinois via immigrant-owned businesses and investments.

In addition, Anna is actively involved in immigration policy development through her participation on committees such as the American Jewish Committee/Ford Foundation Immigration Advocacy Project. As a native of Poland, she is fluent in both English and Polish and is personally and professionally a prominent member of Chicago’s Polish community.

Photo of Katherine M. Rozmus Katherine M. Rozmus

Katherine M. Rozmus focuses her practice on a full range of business immigration matters, including nonimmigrant visa categories (B, E, H, J, L, O, TN), permanent residency categories (Extraordinary Ability/Outstanding Researchers, Multinational Managers and Executives, PERM, Adjustment of Status), and naturalization applications.