USCIS posted a notice that as of Aug. 19, 2022, the U.S. Department of Education no longer recognizes the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) as an accrediting

Continue Reading U.S. Department of Education No Longer Recognizes ACICS as an Accrediting Agency

On Feb. 16, 2018, USCIS published the final policy memorandum on signature requirements, which changed its existing rules for signatures on written requests filed with USCIS. Effective March 18, 2018, all paper filings with the USCIS must include a handwritten ink signature and USCIS will no longer accept signatures of individuals based on power of attorney for corporate clients. The only exceptions where power of attorney signatures will still be accepted are signatures on behalf of children under 14 and individuals with disabilities. There are additional changes made by the final policy memorandum, such as a requirement that an authorized signatory must be employed by the petitioner and that USCIS may reject a form submitted with a faulty signature instead of offering the opportunity to fix the deficiency. Below is a quick summary of the key points identified by the final policy memo regarding signature requirements.

Continue Reading USCIS Finalizes Guidance on Signature Requirements – With Limited Exceptions, USCIS No Longer Accepts Power of Attorney Signatures

For over a decade, filing an extension of nonimmigrant status in visa categories such as the H-1B was a fairly routine process for cases involving the same employer and same
Continue Reading New Trump Administration Policy in Support of Buy American, Hire American Toughens Visa Extension Process